Rhetorical Knowledge and Purposeful Writing. Student work demonstrates an understanding of the rhetorical nature of writing and language use and successfully addresses academic and non-academic audiences by adopting clear and consistent purposes, as well as appropriate organization, tone, and format, according to genre.


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>>The purpose of this assignment to is to get students to think about how to discuss issues with people who may or may not agree with them. This assignment can be adapted to fit any topic you are already covering in class, it does not have to be such a controversial topic if you do not want to open up that type of discussion. I recently adapted this to discuss street art.
>>This is designed to help students look at grammar in a different way and then apply to their own papers. It should follow a lesson on how grammar can be used to change tone.

>>This in-class discussion/activity is geared towards blog posts as that is what they were writing for paper 2. The purpose is to raise awareness of rhetorical grammar (specifically sentence structure), and what this means as a writer writing for different audiences.
>>This paper shows students how to use the known-new contract. This helps students write more lucid, connected prose.
>>This exercise can help you teach your student to focus extra-long, complicated sentences.







Writing About Writing (collection with readings on rhetoric/writing/language-related topics)
Language Awareness (collection with readings on rhetoric/writing/language-related topics)
"What is Rhetoric?" (Silvae Rhetoricae)
Basic Questions for Rhetorical Analysis (BYU)
Understanding Misunderstandings: How to do a rhetorical analysis

Teaching Audience: National Writing Project
Writing Guide: Audience (Colorado State University)
Audience Style Sheet (Hamilton)
About the Rhetorical Situation (Purdue OWL)
Features of "Academic Writing"


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>> I use this audience workshop to get students to take their chosen topic and argumentative purpose and see how the messages and the delivery of that message varies depending on audience. They have to play with rhetorical choices for three separate audiences and choose the best option.
>> After teaching stasis theory and providing several examples of how we use stasis to develop an argument (using the development of a criminal case is particularly effective, I think), I ask students to write their topic at the top of this worksheet and then think of as many questions as possible within each of the levels of stasis. This helps them think through the real point of contention in their argument and what kinds of information their audience is likely to need to know.
>> I like to show a controversial clip, like an interview with Ann Coulter, and then hand out this worksheet to get students to see how the Rogerian rhetorical approach differs from the traditional (Aristotelian) approach. Then I ask them to practice using Rogers' rules of engagement.

>> This assignment has students blend a creative genre with the genre of academic research. In doing so, students learn to identify genre conventions in academia and out, as well as how to adopt clear and consistent purposes, as well as appropriate organization, tone, and format, according to genre.
>> This is my version of the creative Research assignment (based off of Nicole's assignment!). Students write a nonfiction or fiction narrative and incorporate MLA citation.


"Teaching the Rhetorical Dimensions of Research"
"Hitler's Rhetorical Theory" (for critique)

Writing to Multiple Audiences
Genre Research in Academic Contexts (excerpt from Bawarshi & Reiff)



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