PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS FOR ENGLISH 1020 AND 2030

Portfolios are required at the end of English 1020 and 2030 because research in the teaching of writing reveals the efficacy of portfolios, and because student portfolios are used in assessment.

The requirements for the portfolios are not intended to be restrictive. Instructors/TAs are encouraged to adapt them to the specific needs of their courses and contexts of their classrooms. But for consistency across the program and assessment goals, please meet the following requirements:

English 1020: Portfolio Requirements
  • The final portfolio should contain all the “final drafts” of the major projects for the course (typically three papers/projects, perhaps four). If any of the projects are electronic, links should be provided, along with printed copies and/or screen captures.
  • The final portfolio should contain revised versions of two of these projects, revised to the best of students’ abilities. Previous drafts with teacher commentary should be included for these two papers (if possible).
  • The final portfolio should contain a reflective letter that asks students to comment on their progress in the course, their strengths and weaknesses, and how the contents of their portfolio evidence their abilities. There are a variety of model assignments for these letters provided on the wiki.
  • The final portfolio should be delivered in an organized format (not a paper clip of messy papers).

English 2030: Portfolio Requirements
  • The final portfolio should contain all the “final drafts” of the major projects for the course. If any of the projects are electronic, links should be provided, along with printed copies and/or screen captures.
  • The final portfolio should contain a revised version of the major project for the course, revised to the best of the student’s abilities. Previous drafts with teacher commentary should be included for this project (if possible).
  • The final portfolio should contain a reflective letter that asks students to comment on their progress in the course, their strengths and weaknesses, and how the contents of their portfolio evidence their abilities. There are a variety of model assignments for these letters provided on the wiki.
  • The final portfolio should be delivered in an organized format (not a paper clip of messy papers).

What to Do With Portfolios After You’ve Graded Them
  • If you are participating in an assessment meeting, you’ll be asked to bring copies of a selected number of your students’ portfolios.
  • Provide students with your office hours for the next semester so that students can come and pick up their portfolios, if desired. Portfolios should not be left outside your office door (whether graded or not).
  • Keep student work through the entire next semester before disposing of it (so if you taught the class Fall 2012, you can throw away the work at the start of Fall 2013). Remember that you cannot use student work as examples in other courses without student permission, so if you plan to do that, obtain permission.

Resources for the Portfolio
Consider the various suggestions and craft a clear assignment for your students: